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{"id":4461109772385,"title":"Nepenthes of Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia","handle":"nepenthes-of-sumatra-and-peninsular-malaysia","description":"\u003cp\u003eCharles Clarke - NHP\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSPECIAL ORDER ITEM-DELIVERY 4-6 WEEKS\u003cbr\u003eThe great island of Sumatra has 29 species of carnivorous pitcher plants (Nepenthes). They are found throughout the island, from humid peat swamps which lie below sea level, to chilly alpine meadows three kilometers higher. Some species are semi-aquatic while others live a precarious existence on volcanic ash and lava flows. Still others are epiphytes, growing in the forest canopy and remaining out of sight to all but the keenest observers.\u003cbr\u003e \u003cbr\u003eIt therefore comes as a surprise to find that many of the SumatranNepenthes species are known only from a small number of herbarium collections and taxonomic accounts. This book is the first detailed account of this remarkable group of plants in Sumatra. The Nepenthesspecies from the Malay Peninsula, separated from Sumatra by just 75 km, are either found in Sumatra or are closely related, and so therefore appropriate to include. In all, 34 species are illustrated and discussed in detail, including one new species which is described for the first time.\u003cbr\u003e \u003cbr\u003eTable of Contents\u003cbr\u003ePreface viii\u003cbr\u003eChapter 1. Nepenthes, Sumatra and the Malay Peninsula\u003cbr\u003eIntroduction 1\u003cbr\u003eThe Nepenthes Plant 1\u003cbr\u003eHabit 2\u003cbr\u003ePlant Morphology 3\u003cbr\u003eFlowers 4\u003cbr\u003eRoots 6\u003cbr\u003ePitchers 7\u003cbr\u003eDigestion of Prey 9\u003cbr\u003eDistribution 12\u003cbr\u003eThe Sunda Region 12\u003cbr\u003eSumatra 13\u003cbr\u003eGeographical Features 15\u003cbr\u003eClimate 16\u003cbr\u003eVegetation 17\u003cbr\u003eDistribution of Nepenthes 18\u003cbr\u003eThe Malay Peninsula 19\u003cbr\u003eGeogrpahical Features 21\u003cbr\u003eClimate 22\u003cbr\u003eVegetation 22\u003cbr\u003eDistribution of Nepenthes 23\u003cbr\u003eJava 26\u003cbr\u003eSummary 27\u003cbr\u003eChapter 2. Ecology (by Charles Clark \u0026amp; Jonathan Moran)\u003cbr\u003eIntroduction 29\u003cbr\u003eKey Habitats 29\u003cbr\u003eHeath Forests 29\u003cbr\u003ePeat Swamp Forests 30\u003cbr\u003eSecondary Vegetation 32\u003cbr\u003eLimestone 34\u003cbr\u003eSandstone Outcrops pf the Bukit Barisan in Sumatra 34\u003cbr\u003eMontane Forests 34\u003cbr\u003eNepenthes in Their Habitats 40\u003cbr\u003eGrowth Patterns 40\u003cbr\u003eDistribution Patterns 41\u003cbr\u003ePatches 46\u003cbr\u003eGeographical Distribution and Site Preferences of Nepenthes macfarlanei in P. Malaysia (by Lillian S.L. Chua) 47\u003cbr\u003eGeographical Distribution 48\u003cbr\u003eSite Preferences 48\u003cbr\u003eThe Interactions Between Nepenthes and Animals 50\u003cbr\u003ePrey capture by Nepenthes 50\u003cbr\u003eNectar 50\u003cbr\u003eScent 51\u003cbr\u003eColor 51\u003cbr\u003eAccidental Attractions? 53\u003cbr\u003eThe Prey of Nepenthes 54\u003cbr\u003ePitcher Dimorphism and Prey Capture 58\u003cbr\u003eAlternative Nitrogen Sources? 58\u003cbr\u003eThe Inhabitants of Nepenthes Pitchers 61\u003cbr\u003eEarly Research in Java and Sumatra 63\u003cbr\u003eR.A. Beaver’s Research in P. Malaysia 64\u003cbr\u003eFactors that Affect Community Structure and Complexity 65\u003cbr\u003eMisumenops nepenthicola—a Remarkable Inhabitant of Nepenthes Pitches 67\u003cbr\u003ePollination and Reproductive Strategies of Nepenthes (by C.K. Frazier) 68\u003cbr\u003eThe pollinating agents of Nepenthes 70\u003cbr\u003eNectaries in Nepenthes (by Marlis Merbach) 73\u003cbr\u003eThe functions of EFN in Nepenthes 73\u003cbr\u003eTemporal and Spatial Pattern of Nectar Secration 75\u003cbr\u003eChapter 3. The Species\u003cbr\u003eIntroduction 77\u003cbr\u003eEarly Discoveries 77\u003cbr\u003eJ.M. Macfarlane 79\u003cbr\u003eB. H. Danser 79\u003cbr\u003e1929—1985 83\u003cbr\u003eR. Tamin and M. Hotta 83\u003cbr\u003e1987—1996 84\u003cbr\u003eM.H.P. Jebb and M. Cheek 84\u003cbr\u003eRecent Additions 85\u003cbr\u003eThis treatment 85\u003cbr\u003ePhylogenetic Analysis 86\u003cbr\u003eSpecies Diversity and Endermism in the Sunda Region 88\u003cbr\u003eKey to Nepenthes in Sumatra \u0026amp; P. Malaysia 90\u003cbr\u003eThe Species 93\u003cbr\u003eLittle Known Taxa 205\u003cbr\u003eUndescribed and Incompletely Diagnosed Taxa 209\u003cbr\u003eChapter 4. The Natural Hybrids\u003cbr\u003eIntroduction 213\u003cbr\u003eNoteworthy Natural Hybrids 215\u003cbr\u003eChapter 5. Conservation\u003cbr\u003eIntroduction 233\u003cbr\u003eSumatra 233\u003cbr\u003ePeninsular Malaysia 237\u003cbr\u003eSingapore 238\u003cbr\u003eThe International Trade in Nepenthes from Sumatra and P. Malaysia 239\u003cbr\u003eAssessing the Conservation Status of Nepenthes Species 241\u003cbr\u003eThe Threatened Species 242\u003cbr\u003eThe Data Deficient Species 245\u003cbr\u003eSummary 247\u003cbr\u003eChapter 6. Cultivation\u003cbr\u003eIntroduction 249\u003cbr\u003eCultivation of Nepenthes During Victorian Times 249\u003cbr\u003eWho wants to grow Nepenthes and why? 251\u003cbr\u003eCultivation Requirements 252\u003cbr\u003eLowland, Highland and Intermediate Nepenthes 252\u003cbr\u003eThe Tropical Lowland Climate 252\u003cbr\u003eCultivation of Lowland Species 254\u003cbr\u003eLight 254\u003cbr\u003eComposts 255\u003cbr\u003eChoosing an Appropriate Pot 256\u003cbr\u003eWater 257\u003cbr\u003eHumidity 257\u003cbr\u003eGrowing Lowland Nepenthes in Tropical Climate 257\u003cbr\u003eGrowing montane species 258\u003cbr\u003ePropagation 259\u003cbr\u003eFertilizers 261\u003cbr\u003ePests and Diseases 262\u003cbr\u003eApproaches to Cultivating Nepenthes 263\u003cbr\u003eSpecies or Hybrids? 264\u003cbr\u003eManaging a collection 265\u003cbr\u003eConclusion 267\u003cbr\u003eReferences 268\u003cbr\u003eGlossary of Indonesian and Malay Terms 282\u003cbr\u003eGlossary of Botanical Terms 284\u003cbr\u003eAppendix A: Materials \u0026amp; Methods 287\u003cbr\u003eAppendix B: List of Natural Hybrids Recorded from Sumatra \u0026amp; P. Malaysia 297\u003cbr\u003eAppendix C: Distribution maps 299\u003cbr\u003eAcknowledgements 308\u003cbr\u003eGeneral Index 311\u003cbr\u003eIndex to Scientific Names 321\u003cbr\u003eProduct details\u003cbr\u003eN019Published in 2001 \/ 339 pages \/ Language: English \/ 1300g \/ 7.7 x 10.3 x 1.2 inches \/ ISBN: 983-812-050-2\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-01-08T17:48:34+00:00","created_at":"2020-01-08T17:48:34+00:00","vendor":"hccarnivorousplants","type":"Books","tags":["BOOKS"],"price":9299,"price_min":9299,"price_max":9299,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":31641022333025,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":false,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Nepenthes of Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":9299,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":"shopify","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0273\/1415\/9713\/products\/0000281.jpg?v=1578570484"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0273\/1415\/9713\/products\/0000281.jpg?v=1578570484","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":6277923864673,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.71,"height":300,"width":213,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0273\/1415\/9713\/products\/0000281.jpg?v=1578570484"},"aspect_ratio":0.71,"height":300,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0273\/1415\/9713\/products\/0000281.jpg?v=1578570484","width":213}],"content":"\u003cp\u003eCharles Clarke - NHP\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSPECIAL ORDER ITEM-DELIVERY 4-6 WEEKS\u003cbr\u003eThe great island of Sumatra has 29 species of carnivorous pitcher plants (Nepenthes). They are found throughout the island, from humid peat swamps which lie below sea level, to chilly alpine meadows three kilometers higher. Some species are semi-aquatic while others live a precarious existence on volcanic ash and lava flows. Still others are epiphytes, growing in the forest canopy and remaining out of sight to all but the keenest observers.\u003cbr\u003e \u003cbr\u003eIt therefore comes as a surprise to find that many of the SumatranNepenthes species are known only from a small number of herbarium collections and taxonomic accounts. This book is the first detailed account of this remarkable group of plants in Sumatra. The Nepenthesspecies from the Malay Peninsula, separated from Sumatra by just 75 km, are either found in Sumatra or are closely related, and so therefore appropriate to include. In all, 34 species are illustrated and discussed in detail, including one new species which is described for the first time.\u003cbr\u003e \u003cbr\u003eTable of Contents\u003cbr\u003ePreface viii\u003cbr\u003eChapter 1. Nepenthes, Sumatra and the Malay Peninsula\u003cbr\u003eIntroduction 1\u003cbr\u003eThe Nepenthes Plant 1\u003cbr\u003eHabit 2\u003cbr\u003ePlant Morphology 3\u003cbr\u003eFlowers 4\u003cbr\u003eRoots 6\u003cbr\u003ePitchers 7\u003cbr\u003eDigestion of Prey 9\u003cbr\u003eDistribution 12\u003cbr\u003eThe Sunda Region 12\u003cbr\u003eSumatra 13\u003cbr\u003eGeographical Features 15\u003cbr\u003eClimate 16\u003cbr\u003eVegetation 17\u003cbr\u003eDistribution of Nepenthes 18\u003cbr\u003eThe Malay Peninsula 19\u003cbr\u003eGeogrpahical Features 21\u003cbr\u003eClimate 22\u003cbr\u003eVegetation 22\u003cbr\u003eDistribution of Nepenthes 23\u003cbr\u003eJava 26\u003cbr\u003eSummary 27\u003cbr\u003eChapter 2. Ecology (by Charles Clark \u0026amp; Jonathan Moran)\u003cbr\u003eIntroduction 29\u003cbr\u003eKey Habitats 29\u003cbr\u003eHeath Forests 29\u003cbr\u003ePeat Swamp Forests 30\u003cbr\u003eSecondary Vegetation 32\u003cbr\u003eLimestone 34\u003cbr\u003eSandstone Outcrops pf the Bukit Barisan in Sumatra 34\u003cbr\u003eMontane Forests 34\u003cbr\u003eNepenthes in Their Habitats 40\u003cbr\u003eGrowth Patterns 40\u003cbr\u003eDistribution Patterns 41\u003cbr\u003ePatches 46\u003cbr\u003eGeographical Distribution and Site Preferences of Nepenthes macfarlanei in P. Malaysia (by Lillian S.L. Chua) 47\u003cbr\u003eGeographical Distribution 48\u003cbr\u003eSite Preferences 48\u003cbr\u003eThe Interactions Between Nepenthes and Animals 50\u003cbr\u003ePrey capture by Nepenthes 50\u003cbr\u003eNectar 50\u003cbr\u003eScent 51\u003cbr\u003eColor 51\u003cbr\u003eAccidental Attractions? 53\u003cbr\u003eThe Prey of Nepenthes 54\u003cbr\u003ePitcher Dimorphism and Prey Capture 58\u003cbr\u003eAlternative Nitrogen Sources? 58\u003cbr\u003eThe Inhabitants of Nepenthes Pitchers 61\u003cbr\u003eEarly Research in Java and Sumatra 63\u003cbr\u003eR.A. Beaver’s Research in P. Malaysia 64\u003cbr\u003eFactors that Affect Community Structure and Complexity 65\u003cbr\u003eMisumenops nepenthicola—a Remarkable Inhabitant of Nepenthes Pitches 67\u003cbr\u003ePollination and Reproductive Strategies of Nepenthes (by C.K. Frazier) 68\u003cbr\u003eThe pollinating agents of Nepenthes 70\u003cbr\u003eNectaries in Nepenthes (by Marlis Merbach) 73\u003cbr\u003eThe functions of EFN in Nepenthes 73\u003cbr\u003eTemporal and Spatial Pattern of Nectar Secration 75\u003cbr\u003eChapter 3. The Species\u003cbr\u003eIntroduction 77\u003cbr\u003eEarly Discoveries 77\u003cbr\u003eJ.M. Macfarlane 79\u003cbr\u003eB. H. Danser 79\u003cbr\u003e1929—1985 83\u003cbr\u003eR. Tamin and M. Hotta 83\u003cbr\u003e1987—1996 84\u003cbr\u003eM.H.P. Jebb and M. Cheek 84\u003cbr\u003eRecent Additions 85\u003cbr\u003eThis treatment 85\u003cbr\u003ePhylogenetic Analysis 86\u003cbr\u003eSpecies Diversity and Endermism in the Sunda Region 88\u003cbr\u003eKey to Nepenthes in Sumatra \u0026amp; P. Malaysia 90\u003cbr\u003eThe Species 93\u003cbr\u003eLittle Known Taxa 205\u003cbr\u003eUndescribed and Incompletely Diagnosed Taxa 209\u003cbr\u003eChapter 4. The Natural Hybrids\u003cbr\u003eIntroduction 213\u003cbr\u003eNoteworthy Natural Hybrids 215\u003cbr\u003eChapter 5. Conservation\u003cbr\u003eIntroduction 233\u003cbr\u003eSumatra 233\u003cbr\u003ePeninsular Malaysia 237\u003cbr\u003eSingapore 238\u003cbr\u003eThe International Trade in Nepenthes from Sumatra and P. Malaysia 239\u003cbr\u003eAssessing the Conservation Status of Nepenthes Species 241\u003cbr\u003eThe Threatened Species 242\u003cbr\u003eThe Data Deficient Species 245\u003cbr\u003eSummary 247\u003cbr\u003eChapter 6. Cultivation\u003cbr\u003eIntroduction 249\u003cbr\u003eCultivation of Nepenthes During Victorian Times 249\u003cbr\u003eWho wants to grow Nepenthes and why? 251\u003cbr\u003eCultivation Requirements 252\u003cbr\u003eLowland, Highland and Intermediate Nepenthes 252\u003cbr\u003eThe Tropical Lowland Climate 252\u003cbr\u003eCultivation of Lowland Species 254\u003cbr\u003eLight 254\u003cbr\u003eComposts 255\u003cbr\u003eChoosing an Appropriate Pot 256\u003cbr\u003eWater 257\u003cbr\u003eHumidity 257\u003cbr\u003eGrowing Lowland Nepenthes in Tropical Climate 257\u003cbr\u003eGrowing montane species 258\u003cbr\u003ePropagation 259\u003cbr\u003eFertilizers 261\u003cbr\u003ePests and Diseases 262\u003cbr\u003eApproaches to Cultivating Nepenthes 263\u003cbr\u003eSpecies or Hybrids? 264\u003cbr\u003eManaging a collection 265\u003cbr\u003eConclusion 267\u003cbr\u003eReferences 268\u003cbr\u003eGlossary of Indonesian and Malay Terms 282\u003cbr\u003eGlossary of Botanical Terms 284\u003cbr\u003eAppendix A: Materials \u0026amp; Methods 287\u003cbr\u003eAppendix B: List of Natural Hybrids Recorded from Sumatra \u0026amp; P. Malaysia 297\u003cbr\u003eAppendix C: Distribution maps 299\u003cbr\u003eAcknowledgements 308\u003cbr\u003eGeneral Index 311\u003cbr\u003eIndex to Scientific Names 321\u003cbr\u003eProduct details\u003cbr\u003eN019Published in 2001 \/ 339 pages \/ Language: English \/ 1300g \/ 7.7 x 10.3 x 1.2 inches \/ ISBN: 983-812-050-2\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Nepenthes of Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia

Product Description

Charles Clarke - NHP

SPECIAL ORDER ITEM-DELIVERY 4-6 WEEKS
The great island of Sumatra has 29 species of carnivorous pitcher plants (Nepenthes). They are found throughout the island, from humid peat swamps which lie below sea level, to chilly alpine meadows three kilometers higher. Some species are semi-aquatic while others live a precarious existence on volcanic ash and lava flows. Still others are epiphytes, growing in the forest canopy and remaining out of sight to all but the keenest observers.

It therefore comes as a surprise to find that many of the SumatranNepenthes species are known only from a small number of herbarium collections and taxonomic accounts. This book is the first detailed account of this remarkable group of plants in Sumatra. The Nepenthesspecies from the Malay Peninsula, separated from Sumatra by just 75 km, are either found in Sumatra or are closely related, and so therefore appropriate to include. In all, 34 species are illustrated and discussed in detail, including one new species which is described for the first time.

Table of Contents
Preface viii
Chapter 1. Nepenthes, Sumatra and the Malay Peninsula
Introduction 1
The Nepenthes Plant 1
Habit 2
Plant Morphology 3
Flowers 4
Roots 6
Pitchers 7
Digestion of Prey 9
Distribution 12
The Sunda Region 12
Sumatra 13
Geographical Features 15
Climate 16
Vegetation 17
Distribution of Nepenthes 18
The Malay Peninsula 19
Geogrpahical Features 21
Climate 22
Vegetation 22
Distribution of Nepenthes 23
Java 26
Summary 27
Chapter 2. Ecology (by Charles Clark & Jonathan Moran)
Introduction 29
Key Habitats 29
Heath Forests 29
Peat Swamp Forests 30
Secondary Vegetation 32
Limestone 34
Sandstone Outcrops pf the Bukit Barisan in Sumatra 34
Montane Forests 34
Nepenthes in Their Habitats 40
Growth Patterns 40
Distribution Patterns 41
Patches 46
Geographical Distribution and Site Preferences of Nepenthes macfarlanei in P. Malaysia (by Lillian S.L. Chua) 47
Geographical Distribution 48
Site Preferences 48
The Interactions Between Nepenthes and Animals 50
Prey capture by Nepenthes 50
Nectar 50
Scent 51
Color 51
Accidental Attractions? 53
The Prey of Nepenthes 54
Pitcher Dimorphism and Prey Capture 58
Alternative Nitrogen Sources? 58
The Inhabitants of Nepenthes Pitchers 61
Early Research in Java and Sumatra 63
R.A. Beaver’s Research in P. Malaysia 64
Factors that Affect Community Structure and Complexity 65
Misumenops nepenthicola—a Remarkable Inhabitant of Nepenthes Pitches 67
Pollination and Reproductive Strategies of Nepenthes (by C.K. Frazier) 68
The pollinating agents of Nepenthes 70
Nectaries in Nepenthes (by Marlis Merbach) 73
The functions of EFN in Nepenthes 73
Temporal and Spatial Pattern of Nectar Secration 75
Chapter 3. The Species
Introduction 77
Early Discoveries 77
J.M. Macfarlane 79
B. H. Danser 79
1929—1985 83
R. Tamin and M. Hotta 83
1987—1996 84
M.H.P. Jebb and M. Cheek 84
Recent Additions 85
This treatment 85
Phylogenetic Analysis 86
Species Diversity and Endermism in the Sunda Region 88
Key to Nepenthes in Sumatra & P. Malaysia 90
The Species 93
Little Known Taxa 205
Undescribed and Incompletely Diagnosed Taxa 209
Chapter 4. The Natural Hybrids
Introduction 213
Noteworthy Natural Hybrids 215
Chapter 5. Conservation
Introduction 233
Sumatra 233
Peninsular Malaysia 237
Singapore 238
The International Trade in Nepenthes from Sumatra and P. Malaysia 239
Assessing the Conservation Status of Nepenthes Species 241
The Threatened Species 242
The Data Deficient Species 245
Summary 247
Chapter 6. Cultivation
Introduction 249
Cultivation of Nepenthes During Victorian Times 249
Who wants to grow Nepenthes and why? 251
Cultivation Requirements 252
Lowland, Highland and Intermediate Nepenthes 252
The Tropical Lowland Climate 252
Cultivation of Lowland Species 254
Light 254
Composts 255
Choosing an Appropriate Pot 256
Water 257
Humidity 257
Growing Lowland Nepenthes in Tropical Climate 257
Growing montane species 258
Propagation 259
Fertilizers 261
Pests and Diseases 262
Approaches to Cultivating Nepenthes 263
Species or Hybrids? 264
Managing a collection 265
Conclusion 267
References 268
Glossary of Indonesian and Malay Terms 282
Glossary of Botanical Terms 284
Appendix A: Materials & Methods 287
Appendix B: List of Natural Hybrids Recorded from Sumatra & P. Malaysia 297
Appendix C: Distribution maps 299
Acknowledgements 308
General Index 311
Index to Scientific Names 321
Product details
N019Published in 2001 / 339 pages / Language: English / 1300g / 7.7 x 10.3 x 1.2 inches / ISBN: 983-812-050-2

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